Oscars 2015: Academy Awards through the years

The first ceremony made the Los Angeles Times’ front page under the headline “Film-Merit Trophies Awarded.” Coverage was all of one photograph and two paragraphs. Since then, the Academy Awards have become an event watched around the world. Scroll down for a year-by-year look at the Oscars.

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The first Academy Awards at the Hollywood Roosevelt's Blossom Room
The first Academy Awards at the Hollywood Roosevelt's Blossom Room (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

Before a large gathering of motion-picture celebrities and other notables, the first Academy Awards ceremony is held at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. Academy President Douglas Fairbanks handed out 15 statuettes for outstanding achievement in 1927 and 1928.

Best picture: “Wings”
Actor: Emil Jannings, “The Last Command” and “The Way of all Flesh”
Actress: Janet Gaynor, “Seventh Heaven,” “Street Angel” and “Sunrise”
Director: Frank Borzage, “Seventh Heaven”

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"Broadway Melody" was released in 1929 and took top honors at the Academy Awards the next year.
"Broadway Melody" was released in 1929 and took top honors at the Academy Awards the next year. (MGM)

The Academy Awards are announced during a banquet attended by 300 academy members and their guests at the Ambassador Hotel. Academy President William C. deMille presents seven gold statuettes.

Best picture: “The Broadway Melody”
Actor: Warner Baxter, “In Old Arizona”
Actress: Mary Pickford, “Coquette”
Director: Frank Lloyd, “The Divine Lady”

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Norma Shearer with her statuette for "The Divorcee."
Norma Shearer with her statuette for "The Divorcee." (Associated Press)

Conrad Nagel, vice president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, presents the statuettes at the third awards ceremony. The 600 attendees watch “Artistic and Otherwise,” a “sound recording film” by Thomas A. Edison on the industry’s progress in the last decade.

Best picture: “All Quiet on the Western Front”
Actor: George Arliss, “Disraeli”
Actress: Norma Shearer, “The Divorcee”
Director: Lewis Milestone, “All Quiet on the Western Front”

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Marie Dressler and Lionel Barrymore after their wins.
Marie Dressler and Lionel Barrymore after their wins. (Associated Press)

The notables of Filmland gather at the Biltmore Hotel for the annual banquet. U.S. Vice President Charles Curtis tells the 2,000 gathered: “To my mind, the motion-picture industry is one of man’s greatest benefactors — it is great in size, in reputation and in worth.”

Best picture: “Cimarron”
Actor: Lionel Barrymore, “Free Soul”
Actress: Marie Dressler, “Min and Bill”
Director: Norman Taurog, “Skippy”

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Biltmore
Wallace Beery, left, and Jackie Cooper starred in "The Champ."
Wallace Beery, left, and Jackie Cooper starred in "The Champ." (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

Lionel Barrymore is the toastmaster at the annual awards banquet at the Ambassador Hotel. Walt Disney is given a special award for his series of Mickey Mouse cartoons. As the ballots are turned in they are dropped into a special machine and tabulated “in full view of the assembled guests.”

Best picture: “Grand Hotel”
Actor: Fredric March, “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” and Wallace Beery, “The Champ”
Actress: Helen Hayes, “The Sin of Madelon Claudet”
Director: Frank Borzage, “Bad Girl”

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Douglas Fairbanks Jr. with Katharine Hepburn in a scene from "Morning Glory"
Douglas Fairbanks Jr. with Katharine Hepburn in a scene from "Morning Glory" (Associated Press)

Katharine Hepburn, still a newcomer to Hollywood, wins her first Academy Award for her work in “Morning Glory.” “Little Women,” in which she also stars, finishes third in the race for best production behind “A Farewell to Arms” and the winner, a film adaptation of playwright Noel Coward’s “Calvacade.”

Best picture: “Cavalcade”
Actor: Charles Laughton, “The Private Life of Henry VIII
Actress: Katharine Hepburn, “Morning Glory”
Director: Frank Lloyd, “Cavalcade”

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Ambassador
Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert in "It Happened One Night."
Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert in "It Happened One Night." (Columbia Pictures)

The humorist Irvin S. Cobb presents the gold statuettes at the Biltmore Hotel. In “a radical departure from all previous elections,” the balloting is done in the open and write-ins are allowed. Although she doesn’t win, Bette Davis receives the most write-in votes for her work in “Of Human Bondage.”

Best picture: “It Happened One Night”
Actor: Clark Gable, “It Happened One Night”
Actress: Claudette Colbert, “It Happened One Night”
Director: Frank Capra, “It Happened One Night”

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Biltmore
Bette Davis, center, with Victor McLaglen, left, and D.W. Griffith
Bette Davis, center, with Victor McLaglen, left, and D.W. Griffith (Los Angeles Times)

Bette Davis and Victor McLaglen win by wide margins at the eighth film awards. Despite a boycott by the writers’ and actors’ guilds, the banquet reservations are sold-out two weeks earlier, according to Frank Capra, the academy president.

Best picture: “Mutiny on the Bounty”
Actor: Victor McLaglen, “The Informer”
Actress: Bette Davis, “Dangerous”
Director: John Ford, “The Informer”

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Biltmore
Jean Arthur and Gary Cooper in "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town"
Jean Arthur and Gary Cooper in "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" (File photo)

Luise Rainer and Paul Muni, both Austrians, are accorded Hollywood’s highest acting honors at the academy banquet at the Biltmore Hotel. The academy for the first time recognizes supporting performances.

Best picture: “The Great Ziegfeld”
Actor: Paul Muni, “The Story of Louis Pasteur”
Actress: Luise Rainer, “The Great Ziegfeld”
Supporting actor: Walter Brennan, “Come and Get It”
Supporting actress: Gale Sondergaard, “Anthony Adverse”
Director: Frank Capra, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town”

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Biltmore
Gale Sondergaard and Joseph Schildkraut star in "The Life of Emile Zola"
Gale Sondergaard and Joseph Schildkraut star in "The Life of Emile Zola" (Warner Bros.)

Spencer Tracy wins for his role in “Captains Courageous” but misses the festivities — he is recuperating from surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital. Luise Rainer wins for the second year in a row. The academy presents its first Irving Thalberg Memorial Award to producer Darryl Zanuck.

Best picture: “The Life of Emile Zola”
Actor: Spencer Tracy, “Captains Courageous”
Actress: Luise Rainer, “The Good Earth”
Supporting actor: Joseph Schildkraut, “The Life of Emile Zola”
Supporting actress: Alice Brady, “In Old Chicago”
Director: Leo McCarey, “The Awful Truth”

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Biltmore
Shirley Temple, 9, presents Walt Disney with a special Oscar.
Shirley Temple, 9, presents Walt Disney with a special Oscar. (Walt Disney Productions)

The 11th film awards, at the Biltmore Hotel, is a year of repeat winners. Both Spencer Tracy and Bette Davis win a second Oscar. Frank Capra takes home his third, and Walter Brennan gets his second. Shirley Temple presents a special award to Walt Disney for “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.”

Best picture: “You Can’t Take It With You”
Actor: Spencer Tracy, “Boys Town”
Actress: Bette Davis, “Jezebel”
Supporting actor: Walter Brennan, “Kentucky”
Supporting actress: Fay Bainter, “Jezebel”
Director: Frank Capra, “You Can’t Take It With You”

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Biltmore
Vivien Leigh with Laurence Olivier at the 1940 banquet.
Vivien Leigh with Laurence Olivier at the 1940 banquet. (Associated Press)

The 12th academy banquet is held in the Cocoanut Grove at the Ambassador Hotel. Hattie McDaniel is the first African American to win an award when she is honored for her work in “Gone With the Wind.” She and her escort are seated at the back of the room.

Best picture: “Gone With the Wind”
Actor: Robert Donat, “Goodbye, Mr. Chips”
Actress: Vivien Leigh, “Gone With the Wind”
Supporting actor: Thomas Mitchell, “Stagecoach”
Supporting actress: Hattie McDaniel, “Gone With the Wind”
Director: Victor Fleming, “Gone With the Wind”

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Ambassador
James Stewart
James Stewart (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, over a two-way radio hookup from Washington, D.C., addresses the 1,400 in attendance at the Biltmore Hotel. The academy presents a new special award to Bob Hope in recognition of his “unselfish services” to the motion-picture industry.

Best picture: “Rebecca”
Actor: James Stewart, “The Philadelphia Story”
Actress: Ginger Rogers, “Kitty Foyle”
Supporting actor: Walter Brennan, “The Westerner”
Supporting actress:Jane Darwell, “The Grapes of Wrath”
Director: John Ford, “The Grapes of Wrath”

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Biltmore
Walter Pidgeon, left, Donald Crisp and Roddy McDowall.
Walter Pidgeon, left, Donald Crisp and Roddy McDowall.

The academy bans formal dress for the first ceremony after the U.S. enters World War II. Many men attend in military uniform. Joan Fontaine beats out her sister Olivia de Havilland for lead actress. The women, seated opposite each other, are dressed in black and wear Spanish mantillas.

Best picture: “How Green Was My Valley”
Actor: Gary Cooper, “Sergeant York”
Actress: Joan Fontaine, “Suspicion”
Supporting actor: Donald Crisp, “How Green Was My Valley”
Supporting actress: Mary Astor, “The Great Lie”
Director: John Ford, “How Green Way My Valley”

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Biltmore
Teresa Wright, left, and Greer Garson in a scene from "Mrs. Miniver."
Teresa Wright, left, and Greer Garson in a scene from "Mrs. Miniver." (Associated Press)

Donald Crisp reads a communication from President Franklin D. Roosevelt to attendees gathered at the Cocoanut Grove: “In total war, motion pictures, like all other human endeavor, have an important part to play in the struggle for freedom and the survival of democracy.”

Best picture: “Mrs. Miniver”
Actor: James Cagney, “Yankee Doodle Dandy”
Actress: Greer Garson, “Mrs. Miniver”
Supporting actor: Van Heflin, “Johnny Eager”
Supporting actress: Teresa Wright, “Mrs. Miniver”
Director: William Wyler, “Mrs. Miniver”

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Paul Lukas, left, Jennifer Jones, Katina Paxinou and Charles Coburn pose backstage with their statuettes.
Paul Lukas, left, Jennifer Jones, Katina Paxinou and Charles Coburn pose backstage with their statuettes. (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

Winners are broadcast to the troops overseas, which keeps the awards on schedule. The ceremony is held at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre but the banquet is eliminated. Among the brief speeches, Katina Paxinou, winner for supporting actress, gives tribute to the men overseas fighting for “liberty, justice and human dignity.”

Best picture: “Casablanca”
Actor: Paul Lukas, “Watch on the Rhine”
Actress: Jennifer Jones, “The Song of Bernadette”
Supporting actor: Charles Coburn, “The More the Merrier”
Supporting actress: Katina Paxinou, “For Whom the Bell Tolls”
Director: Michael Curtiz, “Casablanca”

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Bing Crosby as Father O'Malley in "Going My Way"
Bing Crosby as Father O'Malley in "Going My Way" (File photo)

In one of the most comprehensive victories by a single film, “Going My Way” wins seven major awards. Margaret O’Brien is honored with a special award for outstanding child actress. The ceremony is held at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre.

Best picture: “Going My Way’
Actor: Bing Crosby, “Going My Way”
Actress: Ingrid Bergman, “Gaslight”
Supporting actor: Barry Fitzgerald, “Going My Way”
Supporting actress: Ethel Barrymore, “None But the Lonely Heart”
Director: Leo McCarey, “Going My Way”

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Joan Crawford, too ill to attend the ceremonies, poses at home with her Oscar for "Mildred Pierce" and the film's director, Michael Curtiz.
Joan Crawford, too ill to attend the ceremonies, poses at home with her Oscar for "Mildred Pierce" and the film's director, Michael Curtiz. (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

Joan Crawford’s win is considered a surprise. Wartime restrictions on garb are lifted and stars turn out at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in tuxedos and gowns. The price of a ticket — $37.50 — is at an all-time high.

Best picture: “The Lost Weekend”
Actor: Ray Milland, “The Lost Weekend”
Actress: Joan Crawford, “Mildred Pierce”
Supporting actor: James Dunn, “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn”
Supporting actress: Anne Revere for “National Velvet”
Director: Billy Wilder, “The Lost Weekend”

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Harold Russell holds his two Oscars.
Harold Russell holds his two Oscars. (File photo)

Harold Russell, who had lost both hands in an Army training exercise, earns two Oscars, supporting actor and a special award, for his performance as a veteran struggling to adapt in “The Best Years of Our Lives.” Jack Benny serves as master of ceremonies.

Best picture: “The Best Years of Our Lives”
Actor: Fredric March, “The Best Years of Our Lives”
Actress: Olivia de Havilland, “To Each His Own”
Supporting actor: Harold Russell, “The Best Years of Our Lives”
Supporting actress: Anne Baxter, “The Razor’s Edge”
Director: William Wyler, “The Best Years of Our Lives”

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Shrine
Celeste Holm and director John Stahl at the Mocambo nightclub after her win.
Celeste Holm and director John Stahl at the Mocambo nightclub after her win. (Los Angeles Times)

Loretta Young’s unexpected win for lead actress is a “major upset,” according to The Times’ coverage. Overall, the night brings few other surprises, with the exception of a man arriving in a gorilla suit and making his way into the Shrine Auditorium before law enforcement intervenes.

Best picture: “Gentleman’s Agreement”
Actor: Ronald Colman, “A Double Life”
Actress: Loretta Young, “The Farmer’s Daughter”
Supporting actor: Edmund Gwenn, “Miracle on 34th Street”
Supporting actress: Celeste Holm, “Gentleman’s Agreement”
Director: Elia Kazan, “Gentleman’s Agreement”

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Douglas Fairbanks Jr., left, accepting for Laurence Olivier, Claire Trevor, Jerry Wald, Jane Wyman and Walter Huston.
Douglas Fairbanks Jr., left, accepting for Laurence Olivier, Claire Trevor, Jerry Wald, Jane Wyman and Walter Huston. (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

Hamlet” upsets “Johnny Belinda” and “The Snake Pit” to take best picture honors. Robert Montgomery handles master of ceremony duties for the 1 hour, 20 minute program. Jane Wyman’s win for lead actress is described by The Times as “the most breathless” of the evening.

Best picture: “Hamlet”
Actor: Laurence Olivier, “Hamlet”
Actress: Jane Wyman, “Johnny Belinda”
Supporting actor: Walter Huston, “The Treasure of the Sierra Madre”
Supporting actress: Claire Trevor, “Key Largo”
Director: John Huston, “The Treasure of the Sierra Madre”

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Mercedes McCambridge, center left, John Ireland and Broderick Crawford, center right, in "All the King's Men"
Mercedes McCambridge, center left, John Ireland and Broderick Crawford, center right, in "All the King's Men" (Columbia Pictures)

Character actor Paul Douglas hosts of the 22nd Academy Awards. Though “All the King’s Men” takes the top award, “The Heiress” is the night’s biggest winner, taking home four of the eight Oscars for which it was nominated.

Best picture: “All the King’s Men”
Actor: Broderick Crawford, “All the King’s Men”
Actress: Olivia de Havilland, “The Heiress”
Supporting actor: Dean Jagger, “12 O’Clock High”
Supporting actress: Mercedes McCambridge, “All the King’s Men”
Director: Joseph L. Mankiewicz, for “A Letter to Three Wives”

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Judy Holliday starred with Broderick Crawford, center, and William Holden in "Born Yesterday."
Judy Holliday starred with Broderick Crawford, center, and William Holden in "Born Yesterday." (File photo)

Fred Astaire is host and the RKO Pantages Theatre is the venue, but the night of the 23rd Academy Awards is all about “All About Eve.” The inside Hollywood tale enters the evening with a record 14 nominations. It ultimately wins six.

Best picture: “All About Eve”
Actor: Jose Ferrer, “Cyrano de Bergerac”
Actress: Judy Holliday, “Born Yesterday”
Supporting actor: George Sanders, “All About Eve”
Supporting actress: Josephine Hull, “Harvey”
Director: Joseph L. Mankiewicz, “All About Eve”

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Kim Hunter as Stella in "A Streetcar Named Desire."
Kim Hunter as Stella in "A Streetcar Named Desire." (Warner Bros.)

Singer, dancer, comedian Danny Kaye, the evening’s host, is in the midst of his film career. The night’s top winner, “An American in Paris” is only the second best picture to be in color. The first, “Gone With the Wind” had won the top prize 12 years earlier.

Best picture: “An American in Paris”
Actor: Humphrey Bogart, for “The African Queen”
Actress: Vivien Leigh, “A Streetcar Named Desire”
Supporting actor: Karl Malden, “A Streetcar Named Desire”
Supporting actress: Kim Hunter, “A Streetcar Named Desire”
Director: George Stevens, “A Place in the Sun”

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Shirley Booth laughs heartily as actor Fredric March prepares to give her a kiss on the cheek after she was presented with an Oscar.
Shirley Booth laughs heartily as actor Fredric March prepares to give her a kiss on the cheek after she was presented with an Oscar. (AP Photo)

The first televised ceremony is close to a three-ring circus. The show spans the continent, with Bob Hope hosting in Hollywood and Fredric March in New York at the NBC Century Theatre. Cecil B. DeMille’s circus movie beats the favored nominee, “High Noon.” Many consider DeMille’s film to be the worst movie to ever win best picture.

Best picture: “The Greatest Show on Earth”
Actor: Gary Cooper, “High Noon”
Actress: Shirley Booth, “Come Back, Little Sheba”
Supporting actor: Anthony Quinn, “Viva Zapata!”
Supporting actress: Gloria Grahame, “The Bad and the Beautiful”
Director: John Ford, “The Quiet Man”

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Pantages
Frank Sinatra and Donna Reed win for their performances in "From Here to Eternity."
Frank Sinatra and Donna Reed win for their performances in "From Here to Eternity." (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

The second ceremony to be televised on NBC is again a bi-coastal affair, with Donald O’Connor hosting from the Pantages and Fredric March hosting at the NBC Century Theatre in NYC. Both the lead actor and lead actress awards were presented remotely by Gary Cooper and Shirley Booth, with O’Connor announcing the winners in L.A.

Best picture: “From Here to Eternity”
Actor: William Holden, “Stalag 17”
Actress: Audrey Hepburn, “Roman Holiday”
Supporting actor: Frank Sinatra, “From Here to Eternity”
Supporting actress: Donna Reed, “From Here to Eternity”
Director: Fred Zinnemann, “From Here to Eternity”

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Pantages
Eva Marie Saint and Marlon Brando from a scene in "On the Waterfront"
Eva Marie Saint and Marlon Brando from a scene in "On the Waterfront" (Sony Repertory)

Bob Hope hosts the televised ceremony from Hollywood and Thelma Ritter hosts in New York. A rematch for lead actor between Humphrey Bogart and Marlon Brando, who were both up for the award three years earlier, ends with Brando getting his first Oscar, for his role in “On the Waterfront.”

Best picture: “On the Waterfront”
Actor: Marlon Brando, “On the Waterfront”
Actress: Grace Kelly, “The Country Girl”
Supporting actor: Edmond O’Brien, “The Barefoot Contessa”
Supporting actress: Eva Marie Saint, “On the Waterfront”
Director: Elia Kazan for “On the Waterfront”

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Pantages
Betsy Blair and Ernest Borgnine in a scene from "Marty"
Betsy Blair and Ernest Borgnine in a scene from "Marty" (United Artists)

Jerry Lewis hosts in Hollywood with Claudette Colbert and director Joseph L. Mankiewicz sharing duties in New York. The slight, short, low-budget underdog drama “Marty” triumphs with four awards.

Best picture: “Marty”
Actor: Ernest Borgnine, “Marty”
Actress: Anna Magnani, “The Rose Tattoo”
Supporting actor: Jack Lemmon, “Mister Roberts”
Supporting actress: Jo Van Fleet, “East of Eden”
Director: Delbert Mann, “Marty”

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Pantages
Dorothy Malone and Anthony Quinn
Dorothy Malone and Anthony Quinn (Associated Press)

Oscar returns to its love affair with epics — all five best picture nominees are lavish, full-color productions. Jerry Lewis hosts on the West Coast, with Celeste Holm in New York. The first foreign-language film award goes to Federico Fellini’s “La Strada.”

Best picture: “Around the World in 80 Days”
Actor: Yul Brynner, “The King and I”
Actress: Ingrid Bergman, “Anastasia”
Supporting actor: Anthony Quinn, “Lust for Life”
Supporting actress: Dorothy Malone, “Written on the Wind”
Director: George Stevens, “Giant”

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Pantages
Alec Guinness in "The Bridge on the River Kwai"
Alec Guinness in "The Bridge on the River Kwai" (Columbia Pictures)

The first Oscar ceremony broadcast live on TV is an L.A.-only affair, featuring multiple hosts, including Bob Hope, Rosalind Russell, David Niven, James Stewart, Jack Lemmon and Donald Duck. “Peyton Place” is notorious for having nine nominations, but no wins.

Best picture: “The Bridge on the River Kwai”
Actor: Alec Guinness, “The Bridge on the River Kwai”
Actress: Joanne Woodward, “The Three Faces of Eve”
Supporting actor: Red Buttons, “Sayonara”
Supporting actress: Miyoshi Umeki, “Sayonara”
Director: David Lean, “The Bridge on the River Kwai”

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Pantages
Susan Hayward wipes the brow of fellow winner David Niven.
Susan Hayward wipes the brow of fellow winner David Niven. (Los Angeles Times)

The telecast from the Pantages Theatre is noted for its shortness. In fact, the broadcast ends 20 minutes earlier than expected, leaving host Jerry Lewis attempting to fill time. This marks the last time anyone says the Oscars ceremony is too short.

Best picture: “Gigi”
Actor: David Niven, “Separate Tables”
Actress: Susan Hayward, “I Want to Live!”
Supporting actor: Burl Ives, “The Big Country”
Supporting actress: Wendy Hiller, “Separate Tables”
Director: Vincente Minnelli, “Gigi”

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Pantages
Stephen Boyd, left, and Charlton Heston in a legendary chariot race from "Ben-Hur."
Stephen Boyd, left, and Charlton Heston in a legendary chariot race from "Ben-Hur." (File photo)

Bob Hope oversees a ceremony that makes history with the most honored film ever at the Oscars:
“Ben-Hur.” The biblical epic, with its Oscar-worthy running time of more than three hours, wins 11 of the 12 awards it is nominated for.

Best picture: “Ben-Hur”
Actor: Charlton Heston, “Ben-Hur”
Actress: Simone Signoret, “Room at the Top”
Supporting actor: Hugh Griffith, “Ben-Hur”
Supporting actress: Shelley Winters, “The Diary of Anne Frank”
Director: William Wyler, “Ben-Hur”

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Pantages
Burt Lancaster and Elizabeth Taylor
Burt Lancaster and Elizabeth Taylor (Associated Press)

The Oscars move out of Hollywood for the first time, to the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. In another first, ABC broadcasts the ceremony. Bob Hope hosts and Billy Wilder’s “The Apartment” becomes the last black-and-white best picture winner until “Schindler’s List” in 1994.

Best picture: “The Apartment”
Actor: Burt Lancaster, “Elmer Gantry”
Actress: Elizabeth Taylor, “Butterfield 8”
Supporting actor: Peter Ustinov for “Spartacus”
Supporting actress: Shirley Jones, “Elmer Gantry”
Director: Billy Wilder, “The Apartment”

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Santa Monica
Sophia Loren, left, in "Two Women"
Sophia Loren, left, in "Two Women" (Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences)

Bob Hope hosts the awards for the seventh time. The ceremony lasts over two hours, a first. Lax security allows a New York City cab driver to get up on stage and award Hope with his own homemade Oscar statuette.

Best picture: “West Side Story”
Actor: Maximilian Schell, “Judgment at Nuremberg”
Actress: Sophia Loren, “Two Women”
Supporting actor: George Chakiris, “West Side Story”
Supporting actress: Rita Moreno, “West Side Story”
Director: Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins, “West Side Story”

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Santa Monica
Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird" (Universal Studios)

Frank Sinatra hosts the awards from the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, but he almost doesn’t make it into the building. The singer forgets his parking sticker and is turned away from the parking lot by security. He has to park his own car and hustle over to the auditorium.

Best picture: “Lawrence of Arabia”
Actor: Gregory Peck, “To Kill a Mockingbird”
Actress: Anne Bancroft, “The Miracle Worker”
Supporting actor: Ed Begley, “Sweet Bird of Youth”
Supporting actress: Patty Duke, “The Miracle Worker”
Director: David Lean, “Lawrence of Arabia”

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Santa Monica
Sidney Poitier and Lilia Skala in "Lilies of the Field"
Sidney Poitier and Lilia Skala in "Lilies of the Field" (File photo)

Jack Lemmon hosts in Santa Monica. “Tom Jones” picks up best picture and is the only film in history to get three supporting actress nominations. Sidney Poitier’s win is greeted with a roar of approval.

Best picture: “Tom Jones”
Actor: Sidney Poitier, “Lilies of the Field”
Actress: Patricia Neal, “Hud”
Supporting actor: Melvyn Douglas, “Hud”
Supporting actress: Margaret Rutherford, “The V.I.P.’s”
Director: Tony Richardson, “Tom Jones”

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Santa Monica
Julie Andrews waves as she arrives at the Oscars ceremony.
Julie Andrews waves as she arrives at the Oscars ceremony. (Los Angeles Times)

The academy is feeling generous to a handful of films, with three movies earning 12 or more nominations. Bob Hope presides again. Julie Andrews, who’d been passed over for Audrey Hepburn for the lead in “My Fair Lady,” takes home the Oscar for “Mary Poppins.”

Best picture: “My Fair Lady”
Actor: Rex Harrison, “My Fair Lady”
Actress: Julie Andrews,”Mary Poppins”
Supporting actor: Peter Ustinov, “Topkapi”
Supporting actress: Lila Kedrova, “Zorba the Greek”
Director: George Cukor, “My Fair Lady”

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Santa Monica
Shelley Winters as the abusive mother in "A Patch of Blue"
Shelley Winters as the abusive mother in "A Patch of Blue" (MGM)

The Oscars are broadcast in color for the first time. Bob Hope hosts again. The two most nominated films, “Doctor Zhivago” and “The Sound of Music,” are also two of the biggest box-office hits of all time.

Best picture: “The Sound of Music”
Actor: Lee Marvin, “Cat Ballou”
Actress: Julie Christie, “Darling”
Supporting actor: Martin Balsam, “A Thousand Clowns”
Supporting actress: Shelley Winters, “A Patch of Blue”
Director: Robert Wise, “The Sound of Music”

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Santa Monica
Walter Matthau with presenter Shelley Winters
Walter Matthau with presenter Shelley Winters (File photo)

A strike by the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) threatens to derail the Oscars, but is settled with just hours to spare. Bob Hope is back for his 16th time as host and quips when the show returns from commercial without a cue: “I’m not ready for another crisis.”

Best picture: “A Man for All Seasons”
Actor: Best actor: Paul Scofield, “A Man for All Seasons”
Actress: Elizabeth Taylor, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”
Supporting actor: Walter Matthau, “The Fortune Cookie”
Supporting actress: Sandy Dennis, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”
Director: Fred Zinnemann, “A Man for All Seasons”

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Santa Monica
Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger in a scene from "In the Heat of the Night"
Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger in a scene from "In the Heat of the Night" (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

Hollywood is changing and the Oscars ceremony reflects it. While lavish holdovers of the previous era are still in evidence (“Doctor Dolittle”), they seem out of place with the crop of New Hollywood productions, including “The Graduate” and “Bonnie and Clyde.” Bob Hope hosts again.

Best picture: “In the Heat of the Night”
Actor: Rod Steiger, “In the Heat of the Night”
Actress: Katharine Hepburn, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”
Supporting actor: George Kennedy, “Cool Hand Luke”
Supporting actress: Estelle Parsons, “Bonnie and Clyde”
Director: Mike Nichols, “The Graduate”

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Santa Monica
Oscar winner Barbra Streisand sports a transparent bell bottom jumpsuit.
Oscar winner Barbra Streisand sports a transparent bell bottom jumpsuit. (Associated Press)

It’s a tie! The academy awards the lead actress Oscar to Barbra Streisand for “Funny Girl” and to Katharine Hepburn for “The Lion in Winter.” It’s the first time the ceremony has been held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in downtown Los Angeles.

Best picture: “Oliver!”
Actor: Cliff Robertson, “Charly”
Actress: Barbra Streisand, “Funny Girl”; and Katharine Hepburn, “The Lion in Winter”
Supporting actor: Jack Albertson, “The Subject Was Roses”
Supporting actress: Ruth Gordon, “Rosemary’s Baby”
Director: Carol Reed, “Oliver!”

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John Wayne accepts his Oscar as presenter Barbra Streisand looks on.
John Wayne accepts his Oscar as presenter Barbra Streisand looks on. (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

The Oscars are held at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The show is picketed by blacks protesting the lack of black musicians in the orchestra and Latinos upset about portrayals in “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” John Wayne picks up his first Oscar, for “True Grit,” and comments: “I should have put on that eye patch 35 years ago.”

Best picture: “Midnight Cowboy”
Actor: John Wayne, “True Grit”
Actress: Maggie Smith, “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie”
Supporting actor: Gig Young, “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?”
Supporting actress: Goldie Hawn, “Cactus Flower”
Director: John Schlesinger, “Midnight Cowboy”

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George C. Scott is seen in a 20th Century Fox handout photo from the 1970 movie "Patton."
George C. Scott is seen in a 20th Century Fox handout photo from the 1970 movie "Patton." (AP Photo / 20th Century Fox)

Patton” makes what The Times calls an “astonishing” sweep, earning eight Oscars, including lead actor for George C. Scott, who had previously said he would refuse the honor. The ceremony introduces an award for original song score, which goes to the Beatles for “Let it Be.”

Best picture: “Patton”
Actor: George C. Scott, “Patton”
Actress: Glenda Jackson, “Women in Love”
Supporting actor: John Mills, “Ryan’s Daughter”
Supporting actress: Helen Hayes, “Airport”
Director: Franklin J. Schaffner, “Patton”

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Jack Lemmon, left, presents Charlie Chaplin with his second honorary Oscar in 1972.
Jack Lemmon, left, presents Charlie Chaplin with his second honorary Oscar in 1972. (File photo)

Charlie Chaplin returns after 20 years of self-imposed exile from the U.S. to accept a special award six days before his 83rd birthday. Helen Hayes, Sammy Davis Jr., Jack Lemmon and Alan King host. The show ends with a rendition of Chaplin’s “Smile.”

Best picture: “The French Connection”
Actor: Gene Hackman, “The French Connection”
Actress: Jane Fonda, “Klute”
Supporting actor: Ben Johnson, “The Last Picture Show”
Supporting actress: Cloris Leachman, “The Last Picture Show”
Director: William Friedkin, “The French Connection”

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Sacheen Littlefeather holds up a statement that she read to the press March 27, 1973, at the Academy Awards ceremony in Los Angeles on behalf of Marlon Brando.
Sacheen Littlefeather holds up a statement that she read to the press March 27, 1973, at the Academy Awards ceremony in Los Angeles on behalf of Marlon Brando. (Associated Press Photo)

Marlon Brando stirs controversy when he sends a young Native American woman to refuse his Oscar for “The Godfather.” Sacheen Littlefeather’s speech is both booed and cheered by attendees. Co-host Charlton Heston arrives late for duties and Clint Eastwood “brought down the house with his efforts to read Heston’s speech from prompt-cards.”

Best picture: “The Godfather”
Actor: Marlon Brando, “The Godfather”
Actress: Liza Minnelli, “Cabaret”
Supporting actor: Joel Grey, “Cabaret”
Supporting actress: Eileen Heckart, “Butterflies Are Free”
Director: Bob Fosse, “Cabaret”

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A man later identified as Robert Opel streaks behind host David Niven.
A man later identified as Robert Opel streaks behind host David Niven. (Associated Press)

Tatum O’Neal, 9, gets a sustained ovation for her unexpected win. Katharine Hepburn, a three-time winner, makes her first appearance at the awards in order to present the Irving Thalberg Memorial Award to producer Lawrence Weingarten. David Niven is at the podium when a streaker makes his way across the stage.

Best picture: “The Sting”
Actor: Jack Lemmon, “Save the Tiger”
Actress: Glenda Jackson, “A Touch of Class”
Supporting actor: John Houseman, “The Paper Chase”
Supporting actress: Tatum O’Neal, “Paper Moon”
Director: George Roy Hill, “The Sting”

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Robert De Niro as Vito Corleone in "The Godfather Part II"
Robert De Niro as Vito Corleone in "The Godfather Part II" (Paramount Pictures)

Wins by Art Carney and Ellen Burstyn are crowd-pleasers. Carney gets an extra ovation when he thanks his agent for urging him to take the role with the advice: “Do it! You are old!” Francis Ford Coppola has a big night, personally taking home three Oscars for “The Godfather Part II.”

Best picture: “The Godfather Part II
Actor: Art Carney, “Harry and Tonto”
Actress: Ellen Burstyn, “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore”
Supporting actor: Robert De Niro, “The Godfather Part II
Supporting actress: Ingrid Bergman, “Murder on the Orient Express”
Director: Francis Ford Coppola, “The Godfather Part II

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R.P. McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) and Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”
R.P. McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) and Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (Fantasy Films)

Cuckoo’s Nest” sweeps the Oscars, marking the first time since 1934’s “It Happened One Night” that one film claims four top awards — best picture, lead actress, lead actor and director. Octogenarian Mary Pickford accepts a special Oscar in a segment filmed earlier at her famed estate Pickfair.

Best picture: “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”
Actor: Jack Nicholson, “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”
Actress: Louise Fletcher, “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”
Supporting actor: George Burns, “The Sunshine Boys”
Supporting actress: Lee Grant, “Shampoo”
Director: Milos Forman, “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”

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Peter Finch starred as Howard Beale in "Network"
Peter Finch starred as Howard Beale in "Network" (MGM)

Peter Finch becomes the first actor to win a posthumous Oscar, for his role in “Network.” During the show, Sylvester Stallone, who wrote and starred in best picture winner “Rocky,” jokingly spars on stage with boxing great Muhammad Ali, who kids him about “stealing my script.”

Best picture: “Rocky”
Actor: Peter Finch, “Network”
Actress: Faye Dunaway, “Network”
Supporting actor: Jason Robards, “All the President’s Men”
Supporting actress: Beatrice Straight, “Network”
Director: John G. Avildsen, “Rocky”

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Woody Allen and Diane Keaton in "Annie Hall"
Woody Allen and Diane Keaton in "Annie Hall" (File photo)

Box-office blockbuster “Star Wars” fails to take any top awards but does secure six regular and one special Oscar. Woody Allen is a no-show and Vanessa Redgrave’s fiery, political acceptance speech draws boos and hisses.

Best picture: “Annie Hall”
Actor: Richard Dreyfuss, “The Goodbye Girl”
Actress: Diane Keaton, “Annie Hall”
Supporting actor: Jason Robards, “Julia”
Supporting actress: Vanessa Redgrave, “Julia”
Director: Woody Allen, “Annie Hall”

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Jon Voight and Jane Fonda
Jon Voight and Jane Fonda (Los Angeles Times)

Two controversial films about dealing with the war in Vietnam win top honors. Jane Fonda speaks in sign language during her acceptance speech. John Wayne and Laurence Olivier, both in poor health, get standing ovations when they appear on stage.

Best picture: “The Deer Hunter”
Actor: Jon Voight, “Coming Home”
Actress: Jane Fonda, “Coming Home”
Supporting actor: Christopher Walken, “The Deer Hunter”
Supporting actress: Maggie Smith, “California Suite”
Director: Michael Cimino, “The Deer Hunter”

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Jack Lemmon, Meryl Streep and presenter Cloris Leachman
Jack Lemmon, Meryl Streep and presenter Cloris Leachman (Los Angeles Times)

Kramer vs. Kramer” wins five Oscars, including best picture, director, lead actor and supporting actress — Meryl Streep’s first Oscar win. She beats out fellow “Kramer vs. Kramer” actress Jane Alexander for the award. Johnny Carson hosts.

Best picture: “Kramer vs. Kramer”
Actor: Dustin Hoffman, “Kramer vs. Kramer”
Actress: Sally Field, “Norma Rae”
Director: Robert Benton, “Kramer vs. Kramer”
Supporting actor: Melvyn Douglas, “Being There”
Supporting actress: Meryl Streep, “Kramer vs. Kramer”

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Robert De Niro portrayed Jake La Motta in "Raging Bull"
Robert De Niro portrayed Jake La Motta in "Raging Bull" (United Artists)

The ceremony, hosted by Johnny Carson, is scheduled for March 30 but postponed a day after the assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan. The acting winners are all under 40. De Niro declines to talk about any connection between “Taxi Driver” and the attempt on the president’s life.

Best picture: “Ordinary People”
Actor: Robert De Niro, “Raging Bull”
Actress: Sissy Spacek, “Coal Miner’s Daughter”
Supporting actor: Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People”
Supporting actress: Mary Steenburgen, “Melvin and Howard”
Director: Robert Redford, “Ordinary People”

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Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn in "On Golden Pond"
Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn in "On Golden Pond" (Universal Studios)

Chariots of Fire” beats out “Reds,” “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” “On Golden Pond” and “Atlantic City” for best picture. Henry Fonda wins lead actor for “On Golden Pond” at age 76, setting a record as the oldest winner in the category. His only previous acting nomination was four decades prior for “The Grapes of Wrath.” Johnny Carson hosts.

Best picture: “Chariots of Fire”
Actor: Henry Fonda, “On Golden Pond”
Actress: Katharine Hepburn, “On Golden Pond”
Supporting actor: John Gielgud, “Arthur”
Supporting actress: Maureen Stapleton, “Reds”
Director: Warren Beatty, “Reds”

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Meryl Streep and Ben Kingsley
Meryl Streep and Ben Kingsley (Los Angeles Times)

Meryl Streep wins her first lead actress Oscar for her performance in “Sophie’s Choice.” Johnny Carson is absent and hosting duties are shared by Walter Mathhau, Liza Minelli, Dudley Moore and Richard Pryor.

Best picture: “Gandhi”
Actor: Ben Kingsley, “Gandhi”
Actress: Meryl Streep, “Sophie’s Choice”
Supporting actor: Louis Gossett Jr., “An Officer and a Gentleman”
Supporting actress: Jessica Lange, “Tootsie”
Director: Richard Attenborough, “Gandhi”

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James Brooks, left, Shirley MacLaine and Jack Nicholson won awards for "Terms of Endearment."
James Brooks, left, Shirley MacLaine and Jack Nicholson won awards for "Terms of Endearment." (Los Angeles Times)

Terms of Endearment” wins five of its 11 nomination categories, including best picture. Linda Hunt wins the supporting actress Oscar for “The Year of Living Dangerously,” in which she played a male photographer. It’s the first time an actor wins an Oscar for portraying a character of the opposite sex. Johnny Carson is back as host.

Best picture: “Terms of Endearment”
Actor: Robert Duvall, “Tender Mercies”
Actress: Shirley MacLaine, “Terms of Endearment”
Supporting actor: Jack Nicholson, “Terms of Endearment”
Supporting actress: Linda Hunt, “The Year of Living Dangerously”
Director: James Brooks, “Terms of Endearment”

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Haing Ngor, right, and Sam Waterston in "The Killing Fields"
Haing Ngor, right, and Sam Waterston in "The Killing Fields"

Amadeus” wins the top prize, but the ceremony is best remembered for Sally Field’s acceptance speech: “The first time I didn’t feel it, but this time I feel it, and I can’t deny the fact that you like me, right now, you like me!” Jack Lemmon hosts.

Best picture: “Amadeus”
Actor: F. Murray Abraham, “Amadeus”
Actress: Sally Field, “Places in the Heart”
Supporting actor: Haing S. Ngor, “The Killing Fields”
Supporting actress: Peggy Ashcroft, “A Passage to India”
Director: Milos Forman, “Amadeus”

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Cher presented Don Ameche with the supporting actor Oscar for his performance in "Cocoon."
Cher presented Don Ameche with the supporting actor Oscar for his performance in "Cocoon." (Lennox McLendon / Associated Press)

Out of Africa,” nominated in 11 categories, wins seven Oscars, including best picture and best director. The night’s big story is the total shut out of “The Color Purple,” also was nominated in 11 categories. Jane Fonda, Alan Alda and Robin Williams co-host.

Best picture: “Out of Africa”
Actor: William Hurt, “Kiss of the Spider Woman”
Actress: Geraldine Page, “The Trip to Bountiful”
Supporting actor: Don Ameche, “Cocoon”
Supporting actress: Anjelica Huston, “Prizzi’s Honor”
Director: Sydney Pollack, “Out of Africa”

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Tom Cruise, left, and Paul Newman in "The Color of Money"
Tom Cruise, left, and Paul Newman in "The Color of Money" (Fox Broadcasting Co.)

Chevy Chase, Goldie Hawn and Paul Hogan co-host the event — the last ceremony to have multiple hosts for 20 years. “Platoon” wins best picture, director, and two other Oscars. Oliver Stone thanks everyone for “this Cinderella ending.”

Best picture: “Platoon”
Actor: Paul Newman, “The Color of Money”
Actress: Marlee Matlin, “Children of a Lesser God”
Supporting actor: Michael Caine, “Hannah and Her Sisters”
Supporting actress: Dianne Wiest, “Hannah and Her Sisters”
Director: Oliver Stone, “Platoon”

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Cher wins the lead actress Oscar for her performance in  "Moonstruck."
Cher wins the lead actress Oscar for her performance in "Moonstruck." (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

The ceremony is held at the Shrine Auditorium for the first time in 40 years. Cher takes home the lead actress Oscar for “Moonstruck,” but the real star of the night is “The Last Emperor,” which wins Oscars in all nine categories for which it is nominated. Chevy Chase hosts.

Best picture: “The Last Emperor”
Actor: Michael Douglas, “Wall Street”
Actress: Cher, “Moonstruck”
Supporting actor: Sean Connery, “The Untouchables”
Supporting actress: Olympia Dukakis, “Moonstruck”
Director: Bernardo Bertolucci, “The Last Emperor”

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Tom Cruise, left, and Dustin Hoffman in a scene from "Rain Man"
Tom Cruise, left, and Dustin Hoffman in a scene from "Rain Man" (United Artists)

Rain Man,” the story of man whose autistic savant brother inherits their father’s fortune, takes four of the eight Oscars for which it is nominated. The producers change the traditional line “And the winner is…” to “And the Oscar goes to…” But the show goes down in infamy for an opening act that featured Rob Lowe singing with Snow White.

Best picture: “Rain Man”
Actor: Dustin Hoffman, “Rain Man”
Actress:Jodie Foster, “The Accused”
Supporting actor: Kevin Kline, “A Fish Called Wanda”
Supporting actress: Geena Davis, “The Accidental Tourist”
Director: Barry Levinson, “Rain Man”

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Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman in a scene from "Driving Miss Daisy"
Jessica Tandy and Morgan Freeman in a scene from "Driving Miss Daisy" (Warner Bros.)

Billy Crystal hosts the ceremony for the first time. The show is held at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, half the size of the Shrine Auditorium, and producer Gil Cates has to limit the number of tickets for Academy members.

Best picture: “Driving Miss Daisy”
Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, “My Left Foot”
Actress: Jessica Tandy, “Driving Miss Daisy”
Supporting actor: Denzel Washington, “Glory”
Supporting actress: Brenda Fricker, “My Left Foot”
Director: Oliver Stone, “Born on the Fourth of July”

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Kevin Costner in "Dances With Wolves"
Kevin Costner in "Dances With Wolves" (Ben Glass / Orion Pictures Corp.)

Billy Crystal hosts for the second time (he even won two Emmys for the gig). Reba McEntire performs, dedicating the song to her road manager and seven band members who died in a car crash earlier that month. “Dances With Wolves” wins seven Oscars, including best picture.

Best picture: “Dances With Wolves”
Actor: Jeremy Irons, “Reversal of Fortune”
Actress: Kathy Bates, “Misery”
Supporting actor: Joe Pesci, “Goodfellas”
Supporting actress: Whoopi Goldberg, “Ghost”
Director: Kevin Costner, “Dances with Wolves”

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Billy Crystal, in a mask like Hannibal Lecter was forced to wear, greets Anthony Hopkins on stage.
Billy Crystal, in a mask like Hannibal Lecter was forced to wear, greets Anthony Hopkins on stage. (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences)

Billy Crystal hosts for the third consecutive telecast. “The Silence of the Lambs” sweeps the top five categories, including best picture, actor, actress, director and adapted screenplay. Jack Palance, 72, surprises the audience by doing push-ups on stage.

Best picture: “The Silence of the Lambs”
Actor: Anthony Hopkins, “The Silence of the Lambs”
Actress:Jodie Foster, “The Silence of the Lambs”
Supporting actor: Jack Palance, “City Slickers”
Supporting actress: Mercedes Ruehl, “The Fisher King”
Director: Jonathan Demme, “The Silence of the Lambs”

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Gene Hackman and Marisa Tomei
Gene Hackman and Marisa Tomei (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Unforgiven” wins four Academy Awards, including a best director Oscar for Clint Eastwood — his first. Some criticize the theme, “Women and the Movies,” as hypocritical. Considering it’s also the year of “Basic Instinct,” one female screenwriter suggests “year of the psychotic woman” as more appropriate.

Best picture: “Unforgiven”
Actor: Al Pacino, “Scent of a Woman”
Actress: Emma Thompson, “Howards End”
Supporting actor: Gene Hackman, “Unforgiven”
Supporting actress: Marisa Tomei, “My Cousin Vinny”
Director: Clint Eastwood, “Unforgiven”

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Steven Spielberg accepts the best picture Oscar from Harrison Ford for "Schindler's List."
Steven Spielberg accepts the best picture Oscar from Harrison Ford for "Schindler's List." (Bob Carey / Los Angeles Times)

Steven Spielberg wins his first Oscar, for directing and as producer of the best picture winner, with “Schindler’s List.” The Times TV critic Howard Rosenberg pans first-time host Whoopi Goldberg as boring. Bruce Springsteen becomes the first true rocker to win for original song, for “Streets of Philadelphia.”

Best picture: “Schindler’s List”
Actor: Tom Hanks, “Philadelphia”
Actress: Holly Hunter, “The Piano”
Supporting actor: Tommy Lee Jones, “The Fugitive”
Supporting actress: Anna Paquin, “The Piano”
Director: Steven Spielberg, “Schindler’s List”

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Tom Hanks as Forrest Gump.
Tom Hanks as Forrest Gump. (Phillip Caruso / Paramount Pictures)

Forrest Gump” wins six Oscars: for best picture, director, actor, adapted screenplay, visual effects and film editing. Times film critic Kenneth Turan says the awards, spread out among many films, go to “surprisingly deserving choices.”

Best picture: “Forrest Gump”
Actor: Tom Hanks, “Forrest Gump”
Actress: Jessica Lange, “Blue Sky”
Supporting actor: Martin Landau, “Ed Wood”
Supporting actress: Dianne Wiest, “Bullets Over Broadway”
Director: Robert Zemeckis, “Forrest Gump”

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Mel Gibson in "Braveheart"
Mel Gibson in "Braveheart" (Andrew Cooper)

In what was considered a wide-open year for best picture contenders, “Braveheart” beats out an eclectic slate of films, “Apollo 13,” “Babe,” “Sense and Sensibility” and “The Postman (Il Postino).”
The awards came amid a political protest by African American activists led by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, seeking greater minority representation in Hollywood

Best picture: “Braveheart”
Actor: Nicolas Cage, “Leaving Las Vegas”
Actress: Susan Sarandon, “Dead Man Walking”
Supporting actor: Kevin Spacey, “The Usual Suspects”
Supporting actress: Mira Sorvino, “Mighty Aphrodite”
Director: Mel Gibson for “Braveheart”

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Cuba Gooding Jr. won for "Jerry Maguire."
Cuba Gooding Jr. won for "Jerry Maguire." (Los Angeles Times)

Cuba Gooding Jr. wins as expected for supporting actor in “Jerry Maguire.” But Lauren Bacall, 72, is upset in the race for supporting actress, losing to Juliette Binoche. Bacall’s nomination was the first of her 53-year career and came for her performance in “The Mirror has Two Faces.”

Best picture: “The English Patient”
Actor: Geoffrey Rush, “Shine”
Actress: Frances McDormand, “Fargo”
Supporting actor: Cuba Gooding Jr., “Jerry Maguire”
Supporting actress: Juliette Binoche, “The English Patient”
Director: Anthony Minghella, “The English Patient”

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James Cameron won three awards for "Titanic," for director, best picture (as producer) and film editing.
James Cameron won three awards for "Titanic," for director, best picture (as producer) and film editing. (Reed Saxon / Associated Press)

It is a night to remember for “Titanic.” The epic drama continues its passage into film history by winning best picture and 10 other Oscars, tying 1959’s “Ben-Hur” as the most honored film in Academy Awards history. The wins come not long after the film supplants “Star Wars” as the highest-grossing film in Hollywood history.

Best picture: “Titanic”
Actor: Jack Nicholson, “As Good As It Gets”
Actress: Helen Hunt, “As Good As It Gets”
Supporting actor: Robin Williams, “Good Will Hunting”
Supporting actress: Kim Basinger, “L.A. Confidential”
Director: James Cameron, “Titanic”

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Robert Benigni takes an unconventional route to the stage after his "Life Is Beautiful" wins for foreign-language film.
Robert Benigni takes an unconventional route to the stage after his "Life Is Beautiful" wins for foreign-language film. (Los Angeles Times)

A night of surprises is highlighted by the hilariously effusive Roberto Benigni, who co-wrote, directed and starred in “Life is Beautiful.” “I am not able to express all my gratitude because now my body is in tumult,” Benigni tells those gathered. “I would like to be Jupiter and kidnap everybody right now in the firmament, making love to everybody.”

Best picture: “Shakespeare in Love”
Actor: Roberto Benigni, “Life Is Beautiful”
Actress: Gwyneth Paltrow, “Shakespeare in Love”
Supporting actor: James Coburn, “Affliction”
Supporting actress: Judi Dench, “Shakespeare in Love”
Director: Steven Spielberg, “Saving Private Ryan”

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Michael Caine and Kevin Spacey
Michael Caine and Kevin Spacey (Los Angeles Times)

American Beauty” wins five Oscars: best picture, actor, director, original screenplay and cinematography. It is the first best picture Oscar for DreamWorks, the studio founded in 1994 by Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen.

Best picture: “American Beauty”
Actor: Kevin Spacey, “American Beauty”
Actress: Hilary Swank, “Boys Don’t Cry”
Supporting actor: Michael Caine, “The Cider House Rules”
Supporting actress: Angelina Jolie, “Girl, Interrupted”
Director: Sam Mendes, “American Beauty”

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Presenter Angelina Jolie poses backstage with Benicio Del Toro.
Presenter Angelina Jolie poses backstage with Benicio Del Toro. (Los Angeles Times)

Steven Soderbergh wins the directing Oscar for “Traffic.” It marks only the fifth time that a director not honored by his peers in the Directors Guild of America nabs the Academy Award.

Best picture: “Gladiator”
Actor: Russell Crowe, “Gladiator”
Actress: Julia Roberts, “Erin Brockovich”
Supporting actor: Benicio Del Toro, “Traffic”
Supporting actress: Marcia Gay Harden, “Pollock”
Director: Steven Soderbergh, “Traffic”

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Halle Berry and Denzel Washington
Halle Berry and Denzel Washington (Don Kelsen / Los Angeles Times)

In a groundbreaking night for African American performers, Denzel Washington and Halle Berry win lead actor and lead actress. Sidney Poitier receives a lifetime achievement award. The awards show is held at the event’s new home, the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood.

Best picture: “A Beautiful Mind”
Actor: Denzel Washington, “Training Day”
Actress: Halle Berry, “Monster’s Ball”
Supporting actor: Jim Broadbent, “Iris”
Supporting actress: Jennifer Connelly, “A Beautiful Mind”
Director: Ron Howard, “A Beautiful Mind”

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Adrien Brody surprises presenter Halle Berry with a kiss.
Adrien Brody surprises presenter Halle Berry with a kiss. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Wins for Adrien Brody and director Roman Polanski for the Holocaust drama “The Pianist” shock, drawing gasps and sustained applause from the audience. The tall, lanky Brody gives a long, passionate kiss to the previous year’s lead actress Oscar winner, Halle Berry, who presents him with the award.

Best picture: “Chicago”
Actor: Adrien Brody, “The Pianist”
Actress: Nicole Kidman, “The Hours”
Supporting actor: Chris Cooper, “Adaptation”
Supporting actress: Catherine Zeta-Jones, “Chicago”
Director: Roman Polanski, “The Pianist”

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Renée Zellweger, left, and Charlize Theron pose with their Oscar statuettes.
Renée Zellweger, left, and Charlize Theron pose with their Oscar statuettes. (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King,” the final installment of the hugely successful trilogy, makes a clean sweep of all its 11 nominations. Voting came after an abbreviated awards season that cut short Oscar campaigning by a month.

Best picture: “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King”
Actor: Sean Penn, “Mystic River”
Actress: Charlize Theron, “Monster”
Supporting actor: Tim Robbins, “Mystic River”
Supporting actress: Renée Zellweger, “Cold Mountain”
Director: Peter Jackson, “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King”

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Hilary Swank and Morgan Freeman in a scene from "Million Dollar Baby"
Hilary Swank and Morgan Freeman in a scene from "Million Dollar Baby" (Warner Bros.)

Clint Eastwood’s boxing drama “Million Dollar Baby” emerges as the big winner, taking Oscars for best picture, director, lead actress and supporting actor. Eastwood, 74, is the oldest director to earn the top honor. “I’m just a kid,” he tells the audience. “I’ve got a lot of stuff to do yet.”

Best picture: “Million Dollar Baby”
Actor: Jamie Foxx, “Ray”
Actress: Hilary Swank, “Million Dollar Baby”
Supporting actor: Morgan Freeman, “Million Dollar Baby”
Supporting actress: Cate Blanchett, “The Aviator”
Director: Clint Eastwood, “Million Dollar Baby”

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Ang Lee director of "Brokeback Mountain."
Ang Lee director of "Brokeback Mountain." (Kevork Djansezian / Associated Press)

Brokeback Mountain,” among the year’s best-reviewed and most controversial films, wins an Oscar for director Ang Lee, the first non-white director to win. But “Crash” proves the spoiler for best picture. Jon Stewart hosts.

Best picture: “Crash”
Actor: Philip Seymour Hoffman, “Capote”
Actress: Reese Witherspoon, “Walk the Line”
Supporting actor: George Clooney, “Syriana”
Supporting actress: Rachel Weisz, “The Constant Gardener”
Director: Ang Lee, “Brokeback Mountain”

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Forest Whitaker accepts his Oscar for lead actor for his performance as Idi Amin in "The Last King Of Scotland."
Forest Whitaker accepts his Oscar for lead actor for his performance as Idi Amin in "The Last King Of Scotland." (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

Forest Whitaker makes a clean sweep of the 2007 awards season, winning an Oscar, Golden Globe and a BAFTA award for his portrayal of the brutal Ugandan dictator Idi Amin. But Martin Scorsese’s “The Departed” steals the spotlight, snagging best picture, director, adapted screenplay and film editing.

Best picture: “The Departed”
Actor: Forest Whitaker, “The Last King of Scotland”
Actress: Helen Mirren, “The Queen”
Supporting actor: Alan Arkin, “Little Miss Sunshine”
Supporting actress: Jennifer Hudson, “Dreamgirls”
Director: Martin Scorsese, “The Departed”

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Daniel Day-Lewis, Tilda Swinton, Marion Cotillard and Javier Bardem
Daniel Day-Lewis, Tilda Swinton, Marion Cotillard and Javier Bardem (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

For the first time since 1964, all four acting awards go to non-American thespians. Brits Tilda Swinton and Daniel Day-Lewis take home supporting actress and lead actor, and French actress Marion Cotillard and Spanish actor Javier Bardem secure lead actress and supporting actor.

Best picture: “No Country for Old Men”
Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, “There Will Be Blood”
Actress: Marion Cotillard, “La Vie en Rose”
Supporting actor: Javier Bardem, “No Country for Old Men”
Supporting actress: Tilda Swinton, “Michael Clayton”
Director: Joel Coen and Ethan Coen, “No Country for Old Men”

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Kate Winslet, left, Sean Penn and Penélope Cruz
Kate Winslet, left, Sean Penn and Penélope Cruz (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

Health Ledger’s family accepts his posthumous award for supporting actor as the Joker in “The Dark Knight” a little more than a year after he died at 28 of a prescription drug overdose. Kate Winslet finally wins — it is her sixth nomination — and tells the audience she’s been dreaming of the moment for years.

Best picture: “Slumdog Millionaire”
Actor: Sean Penn, “Milk”
Actress: Kate Winslet, “The Reader”
Supporting actor: Heath Ledger, “The Dark Knight”
Supporting actress: Penélope Cruz, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”
Director: Danny Boyle, “Slumdog Millionaire”

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Mo'Nique accepts her Oscar for her performance in "Precious."
Mo'Nique accepts her Oscar for her performance in "Precious." (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

James Cameron’s blockbuster “Avatar” loses the best picture race in an upset to Cameron’s ex-wife Kathryn Bigelow’s film “The Hurt Locker.” “Precious” actress Mo’Nique thanks the academy for honoring the performance “not the politics” and pays tribute to the late Hattie McDaniel.

Best picture: “The Hurt Locker”
Actor: Jeff Bridges, “Crazy Heart”
Actress: Sandra Bullock, “The Blind Side”
Supporting actor: Christoph Waltz, “Inglourious Basterds”
Supporting actress: Mo’Nique, “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire”
Director: Kathryn Bigelow, “The Hurt Locker”

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Christian Bale, Natalie Portman, Melissa Leo and Colin Firth
Christian Bale, Natalie Portman, Melissa Leo and Colin Firth (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

The King’s Speech” takes home top honors, beating out nine other heavyweight contenders. Colin Firth experiences “stirrings” that might become dance moves and Melissa Leo releases an “F-bomb” that rocks the censors.

Best picture: ‘The King’s Speech’
Actor: Colin Firth, “The King’s Speech”
Actress: Natalie Portman, “Black Swan”
Supporting actor: Christian Bale, “The Fighter”
Supporting actress: Melissa Leo, “The Fighter”
Director: Tom Hooper, “The King’s Speech”

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Colin Firth presents Meryl Streep with her first Oscar since 1983.
Colin Firth presents Meryl Streep with her first Oscar since 1983. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

For the first time, a French filmmaker, Michel Hazanavicius, wins the directing Oscar; he made the black-and-white film “The Artist.” Christopher Plummer, at 82 the oldest winner to date, holds the statuette aloft and says: “You’re only two years older than me, darling, where have you been all my life?”

Best picture: “The Artist”
Actor: Jean Dujardin, “The Artist”
Actress: Meryl Streep, “The Iron Lady”
Supporting actor: Christopher Plummer, “Beginners”
Supporting actress: Octavia Spencer, “The Help”
Director: Michel Hazanavicius, “The Artist”

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Ben Affleck walks offstage in 2013.
Ben Affleck walks offstage in 2013. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

For the second straight year, the movie business fell for itself. “Argo” — in which a Hollywood producer and makeup artist help engineer the rescue of six Americans from Iran — won the top prize at the 85th Academy Awards, one year after the silent film story “The Artist” took the best picture Oscar.

Best picture: ‘Argo’
Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, “Lincoln”
Actress: Jennifer Lawrence, “Silver Linings Playbook”
Supporting actor: Christoph Waltz, “Django Unchained”
Supporting actress: Anne Hathaway, “Les Miserables”
Director: Ang Lee, “Life of Pi”

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Lupita Nyong'o holds her supporting actress Oscar. She played Patsey in "12 Years a Slave."
Lupita Nyong'o holds her supporting actress Oscar. She played Patsey in "12 Years a Slave." (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

The harrowing historical drama “12 Years a Slave” took top honors at the 86th Academy Awards, but “Gravity” was the most-lauded film. “Gravity’s” seven awards included best director for Alfonso Cuaron, the first time a Mexican-born director has won that award.

Best picture: “12 Years a Slave”
Actor: Matthew McConaughey, “Dallas Buyers Club”
Actress: Cate Blanchett, “Blue Jasmine”
Supporting actor: Jared Leto, “Dallas Buyers Club”
Supporting actress: Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years a Slave”
Director: Alfonso Cuaron, “Gravity”

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Sources: Times research

Credits: Noelene Clark, Patrick Kevin Day, Blake Hennon, Lily Mihalik, Maloy Moore, Nardine Saad