Timeline

    Endeavour’s trek through L.A.

    The space shuttle En­deav­our is trav­el­ing from Los Angeles In­ter­na­tion­al Air­port to Ex­pos­i­tion Park — a trip ori­gin­ally sched­uled to take place Fri­day and Sat­urday. The voy­age has been more lo­gist­ic­ally chal­len­ging than an­ti­cip­ated, with sev­er­al delays along the route push­ing the ar­rival back nearly a day. The shuttle has moved at a top speed of 2 mph, and at some points along the 12-mile route was just inches away from build­ings.

    Map: The space shuttle’s route

    More: En­deav­our’s cross-coun­try trip to L.A.

    Scroll down or use J and K to advance the time log

    Oct. 14, 2012
    1:37 p.m.

    Endeavour arrives at California Science Center
    The space shuttle Endeavour sits outside its temporary hangar at the California Science Center.
    The space shuttle Endeavour sits outside its temporary hangar at the California Science Center. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

    After a dramatic three-day parade through city streets, Endeavour arrives at its new home at the California Science Center shortly after 1 p.m. Sunday amid cheers from thousands gathered to witness a piece of history.

    Oct. 14, 2012
    12:15 p.m.

    California Science Center

    Endeavour enters Exposition Park
    Space Shuttle Endeavour being moved into it's new home at the California Science Center on Sunday.
    Space Shuttle Endeavour being moved into it's new home at the California Science Center on Sunday. (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

    Endeavour enters Exposition Park and continues the slow voyage to its new home at the California Science Center. After turning left on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and onto Bill Robertson Way, making its way past the Olympic swim stadium, the shutts stops again to prepare to maneuver around trees and light poles.

    Oct. 14, 2012
    11:01 a.m.

    Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

    Space shuttle Endeavour within sight of Exposition Park
    Endeavour along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.
    Endeavour along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. (Andrew Khouri)

    Endeavour is within sight of Exposition Park as it continues to inch its way along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard toward its new home at the California Science Center. The finish line drew near only after several delays several times along the last leg of its two-day, 12-mile journey as it weaved its way around a number of obstacles, sometimes its wings coming within inches of trees and utility poles.

    Oct. 14, 2012
    6:35 a.m.

    Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

    Endeavour clears Leimert Park and cluster of pine trees
    Space shuttle Endeavour in Leimert Park
    Space shuttle Endeavour in Leimert Park (Andrew Khouri)

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour clears Leimert Park and a cluster of pine trees along Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard that had slowed the final leg of its journey to its retirement home at the California Science Center.

    From then on it’s pretty wide open,” said Jeffrey Rudolph, president of the center.

    Oct. 14, 2012
    2:30 a.m.

    Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

    Cheers as space shuttle moves — then, a leak
    Crews work to prepare Endeavour for its final run down Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.
    Crews work to prepare Endeavour for its final run down Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

    After a longer-than-expected pit stop in Leimert Park, the shuttle moves 100 feet only to grind to a halt again. Crews spotted a hydraulic leak from one of the wheeled trailers under the spacecraft, and rushed to put powder over it.

    Oct. 13, 2012
    11:00 p.m.

    California Science Center

    Long waiting game in the dark
    Children at play after dark at Exposition Park.
    Children at play after dark at Exposition Park. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

    By 11 p.m., most of the crowd gathered to greet Endeavour at Exposition Park has gone home. But some remain, stretching blankets between the police barricades and their lawn chairs, forming makeshift tents. They are here for the long haul

    Oct. 13, 2012
    8:42 p.m.

    Martin Luther King Jr. and Crenshaw Blvds.

    Preparing to zigzag between MLK pine trees
    Endeavour approaches Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza Saturday night.
    Endeavour approaches Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza Saturday night. (Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times)

    Already running about six hours behind, Endeavour prepares for its last delicate maneuver -– zigzagging through tall pines lining both sides of Martin Luther King Jr. Bouelvard.

    Officials decided that these trees, planted in honor of the slain civil rights leader, were too important to cut down to make way for Endeavour’s journey to its permanent retirement home. So the shuttle will undergo crab-like movements to avoid striking the pines and make its way east toward the California Science Center.

    Oct. 13, 2012
    4:00 p.m.

    Martin Luther King Jr. and Crenshaw Blvds.

    The show goes on — without Endeavour
    Dancers at Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza.
    Dancers at Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza. (Frank Shyong / Los Angeles Times)

    Confetti flittered from the sky and dancers swooped through the air on suspended rings as Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa took the stage at the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza – but the celebrated guest was nowhere in sight.

    The delay forced organizers of a choreographed dance party at Crenshaw Plaza to pull the trigger early.

    I thought it was going to be 1 p.m., then they said 2 p.m., then 3, then 4,” choreographer Debbie Allen said. “When they said 5 p.m., I just said, ‘OK, let’s do this.’”

    The celebrations began three hours late, about 4 p.m., with a dance routine to “Living in America” and a performance from 10-year-old Sebastian De La Cruz from “America’s Got Talent.”

    Oct. 13, 2012
    4:00 p.m.

    Crenshaw Boulevard

    Endeavour running hours behind schedule
    (Associated Press)

    Endeavour is continuing to make its way up Crenshaw Boulevard after it was temporarily stalled at 73rd Street as workers trimmed branches so the shuttle could navigate around a tree and utility pole.

    The shuttle was supposed to reach Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard for a 2 p.m. performance orchestrated by Debbie Allen. Just before 4 p.m., it crept past 63rd Street, about two miles away.

    Oct. 13, 2012
    1:30 p.m.

    Photos: Endeavour’s journey through L.A.
    (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times )

    Traymond Harris, left, and Ryan Hudge play basketball as the shuttle Endeavour passes through Inglewood Saturday.

    Oct. 13, 2012
    11:52 a.m.

    Crenshaw Blvd. and 84th St.

    Tree briefly delays shuttle
    The space shuttle Endeavour squeezes through a neighborhood lined with apartment buildings as it is transported to the California Science Center on Saturday.
    The space shuttle Endeavour squeezes through a neighborhood lined with apartment buildings as it is transported to the California Science Center on Saturday. (Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images)

    Endeavour took just under five minutes to move from Manchester Boulevard onto Crenshaw Drive, the wheels of its computerized transporters turning perpendicular to Crenshaw as it navigated the turn.

    Moments earlier, police ushered a crowd back 50 feet. “The shuttle cannot make the turn!” An officer warned via loudspeaker.

    But the shuttle did, and proceeded to crawl up Crenshaw past several apartment complexes before it was forced to stop just in front of 84th Place. A tree trunk stood in the way. Because of the curve of the road, the left wing of the shuttle couldn’t clear the trunk.

    Oct. 13, 2012
    11:26 a.m.

    Crenshaw Drive

    Workers prep Endeavour for tight squeeze
    The Space Shuttle Endeavour barely makes its way past a tree as it slowly moves along city streets on a 160-wheeled carrier in Inglewood on Saturday.
    The Space Shuttle Endeavour barely makes its way past a tree as it slowly moves along city streets on a 160-wheeled carrier in Inglewood on Saturday. (Jae C. Hong / Associated Press)

    Rand Brooks, a subcontractor hired to assist in the space shuttle’s move, has been up since midnight Friday night anticipating one of Endeavour’s trickiest maneuvers Saturday as it crosses Crenshaw Boulevard and Crenshaw Drive.

    Crews placed 400 tons of base material made up of broken asphalt, concrete and green material, to keep the shuttle level with the traffic islands at the intersection, Brooks said.

    Endeavour, five stories tall with a 78-foot wingspan, will have to twist and turn when it comes up the narrow drive, inches from a row of apartments.

    Oct. 13, 2012
    11:00 a.m.

    Manchester Blvd. and Kareem Ct.

    Shuttle Delivery Team’ stays busy on route
    Workers erect a light post at Manchester Boulevard and Kareem Court.
    Workers erect a light post at Manchester Boulevard and Kareem Court. (Marisa Gerber / Los Angeles Times)

    About 30 minutes after the space shuttle Endeavour rolled down Manchester Boulevard, a crew of seven electricians donning white hard hats and neon yellow vests took up positions at the intersection of Manchester and Kareem Court.

    Their goal: reconnect the traffic signal to its pole and get it back into the ground. Having removed the fixture to make way for the shuttle, the workers’ neon vests appropriately read “Shuttle Delivery Team.”

    One worker cleared pedestrians from the sidewalk, while three others bent down and collectively struggled to lift the rectangular signal off the ground.

    The stoutest of the workers was impressed by the chunk of metal: “Dang, this is heavy.”

    His co-worker laughed, “You think?”

    Oct. 13, 2012
    9:30 a.m.

    Inglewood Forum

    Crowds, officials celebrate shuttle at Forum
    The Inglewood High School band marches to send-off space shuttle Endeavour from the Inglewood Forum on Saturday.
    The Inglewood High School band marches to send-off space shuttle Endeavour from the Inglewood Forum on Saturday. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

    With music from the science-fiction movie “Men in Black” blaring from the speakers, the shuttle made its glorious turn into the Forum about 90 minutes earlier than planned.

    The Inglewood High School marching band warmed up the crowd before several public officials and three former astronauts took to a small stage for about 30 minutes of remarks.

    Isn’t this exciting?” Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) asked the crowd.

    Oct. 13, 2012
    7:30 a.m.

    Inglewood Forum

    Shuttle arrives Inglewood Forum
    The space shuttle Endeavour is transported to The Forum arena for a stopover and celebration on its way to the California Science Center on Saturday.
    The space shuttle Endeavour is transported to The Forum arena for a stopover and celebration on its way to the California Science Center on Saturday. (Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images)

    Despite crawling along at a speed of about 2 mph, the space shuttle Endeavour appears to be making good time on its journey home to the California Science Center.

    The massive space vehicle pulled up to the Fourm in Inglewood around 7:30 a.m. Saturday, and was greeted by thousands gathered there to see it. It arrived more than an hour ahead of schedule, but Southern California Edison crew members said it will remain at the Fourm until 9:30 a.m. as planned. The crews cleared some transmission lines early and movers decided to proceed.

    Oct. 13, 2012
    6:40 a.m.

    Inglewood City Hall

    Crowds at Inglewood City Hall get glimpse of shuttle
    (KTLA-TV, Channel 5)

    Crowds mingled to the west of the shuttle as it inched down Manchester Boulevard. As the shuttle passed City Hall around 6:40 a.m., the crowd erupted in cheers and began snapping photos

    Music blared from parked cars and people tried to figure out the best way to catch up with the 170,000-pound spacecraft as it made its way down the street toward its final resting spot at the California Science Center in Exposition Park.

    Oct. 13, 2012
    6:00 a.m.

    Manchester Blvd. east of 405 Freeway

    Shuttle on the move again
    Work crews set up a sign as the Space Shuttle Endeavour makes its way to the Forum enroute to the California Science Center on Saturday.
    Work crews set up a sign as the Space Shuttle Endeavour makes its way to the Forum enroute to the California Science Center on Saturday. (Jeff Gritchen / Getty Images)

    Shortly after 6 a.m. Saturday, Endeavour was on the move again after successfully crossing the 405 Freeway overnight.

    Endeavour began inching along Manchester Boulevard through Inglewood from its resting spot just east of the 405. Crowds were lined up on both sides of the street to catch a glimpse of the orbiter.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    11:39 p.m.

    405 Freeway

    Toyota pulls Endeavour over 405
    Space shuttle Endeavour is pulled along W. Manchester Ave and across the 405 freeway overcrossing by a Toyota pickup truck.
    Space shuttle Endeavour is pulled along W. Manchester Ave and across the 405 freeway overcrossing by a Toyota pickup truck. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)

    The space shuttle Endeavour has successfully crossed the 405 Freeway, pulled across the overpass by a silver Toyota Tundra and watched by hundreds of excited space fans.

    Lit by skyward-facing lights, it took the 85-ton shuttle just about three minutes to cross on an overpass above one of the nation’s busiest freeways — a complicated maneuver because of the sheer size of Endeavour and the narrow bridge.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    9:49 p.m.

    405 Freeway overpass

    Shuttle readied for Hollywood closeup in Toyota commercial
    (KTLA-TV, Channel 5)

    As workers prepared to move Endeavour from its specialized transporters to the dollies that would carry it over the 405 Freeway, Manchester Boulevard could have been mistaken for Hollywood.

    In addition to the hundreds of spectators snapping photos of the parked shuttle, several camera crews were on hand to film the shuttle’s trek over the freeway Friday evening.

    Several dozen people with “Endeavour film crew” vests circled the orbiter with sound and camera equipment, the shuttle’s weathered body illuminated by stage lights.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    6:30 p.m.

    Randy's Donuts

    Shuttle brings out fans young and old
    John Olson with his 1912 Fulmer & Schwing black and white view camera.
    John Olson with his 1912 Fulmer & Schwing black and white view camera. (Wesley Lowery / Los Angeles Times)

    John Olson, 64, unloaded his camera of choice for the last 37 years — a 1912 Fulmer & Schwing black and white view camera — and set up for his dream shot: a picture of the shuttle passing the massive doughnut atop Randy’s Donuts.

    That thing flew to outer space!” Olson said. “And now it’s running around the streets of L.A.”

    Although in awe of the shuttle’s size, Olson said the Endeavour isn’t the most impressive thing he’s seen. That distinction, he said, belongs to the five shuttle landings he’s watched in person.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    5:01 p.m.

    Manchester Blvd.

    Shuttle move may cost $10 million
    Spectators gather to watch the space shuttle Endeavour make its way down Manchester Blvd. on Friday.
    Spectators gather to watch the space shuttle Endeavour make its way down Manchester Blvd. on Friday. (Chris Carlson / Associated Press)

    Moving a space shuttle through the streets of Los Angeles is no easy task — nor an inexpensive one.

    The total bill for transporting Endeavour from LAX to its new home at the California Science Center could top $10 million, the Exposition Park museum said. The center is covering the tab with donations — officials have long stressed that none of the costs will be paid with taxpayer dollars

    Oct. 12, 2012
    4:26 p.m.

    Manchester Blvd. and Glasgow Ave.

    Crews prepare for move over 405 freeway
    Southern California Edison employees lift electrical lines in Endeavour's path along Manchester Boulevard.
    Southern California Edison employees lift electrical lines in Endeavour's path along Manchester Boulevard. (Angel Jennings / Los Angeles Times)

    At the corner of Manchester Boulevard and Glasgow Avenue, three transmission lines attached to a hook on a 90-ton crane lifted up the wires to make room for the five-story-tall shuttle. A yellow measuring tape dangled from the lowest wire as crews made sure the shuttle had at least 70 feet of clearance.

    Officials with Southern California Edison said the California Science Center asked them to speed up electrical work in order to make up for delays early Friday morning, and possibly move up the arrival of the shuttle at Exposition Park.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    2:42 p.m.

    California Science Center at Exposition Park

    How is the shuttle moved?
    (Los Angeles Times)

    While the shuttle Endeavour will travel at a top speed of only 2 mph on its trek to the California Science Center, it will be forced to do some maneuvers as nerve-racking as any high-speed pursuit. At five stories tall and 170,000 pounds, the shuttle is so big that any shift in winds or unexpected weather could bring the move to a halt. At several points along the 12-mile route, the spacecraft will be inches away from buildings, even protruding onto driveways and over sidewalks.

    And the girth of the shuttle and its transporting equipment is so enormous that the streets along the route had to be dotted with heavy steel.

    Engineers concluded that the city streets could not support the weight — the equivalent of 30 elephants — so they gathered maps and blueprints to identify all the gas lines, sewers, water pipes, drainage systems and other utilities that needed protecting.

    More: Shuttle’s journey across L.A. is a vast challenge in logistics

    Oct. 12, 2012
    1:50 p.m.

    Remembering Endeavour
    (Los Angeles Times)

    Former Endeavour engineers reminisce about the legacy of the last space shuttle ever built.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    1:30 p.m.

    La Tijera Blvd.

    Endeavour on the move again
    Endeavour towers over pedestrians as it passes by on La Tijera Blvd. in Los Angeles on Friday.
    Endeavour towers over pedestrians as it passes by on La Tijera Blvd. in Los Angeles on Friday. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

    Right at 1:30, the space shuttle Endeavour began to inch forward.

    A stir went up among the crowd gathered in Westchester as the shuttle crept from its temporary parking space to resume its journey toward the California Science Center.

    As the retired orbiter began to move, a noise like an engine starting up washed over the crowd. Children wearing school uniforms shouted excitedly.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    12:59 p.m.

    405 bridge crossing

    Hundreds to lose power as shuttle rolls through
    Workers prepare to bring down a street light temporarily to make room for the space shuttle Endeavour.
    Workers prepare to bring down a street light temporarily to make room for the space shuttle Endeavour. (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

    About 400 Inglewood residents will lose power Friday night as the space shuttle Endeavour makes one of its trickiest maneuvers on its 12-mile trek along the streets of Los Angeles — crossing the 405 Freeway at Manchester Boulevard.

    The planned outage is expected to begin at 10 p.m. and might last up to four hours. Crews are expected to stagger the outage and restore power as promptly as possible, said Ed Antillon, director of distribution and construction with Southern California Edison.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    12:46 p.m.

    La Tijera and Sepulveda Blvds.

    (Genaro Molina)

    A man gets an overall view of the space shuttle Endeavour in a Westchester parking lot. People paid $5 per person to get pictures of the shuttle from the cherry picker.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    12:30 p.m.

    La Tijera and Sepulveda Blvds.

    Endeavour posters are hot item
    Man selling space shuttle Endeavour posters.
    Man selling space shuttle Endeavour posters. (Michael Nelson / EPA )

    By mid-morning, Endeavour had already earned Mitch Warner the better part of $500.

    The wiry 28-year-old with a wide smile and a booming voice walked up and down Sepulveda Boulevard hawking posters. His main product: a poster of the shuttle with a small picture of President Obama in the right hand corner.

    It read: “Once in a lifetime, Shuttle on Shaw.”

    Oct. 12, 2012
    10:00 a.m.

    La Tijera and Sepulveda Blvds.

    Crowds pose with shuttle in Westchester
    (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

    Sitting on traffic signal and road sign pole that was taken down to make room for the shuttle’s move, Tanya Isaacson, 37, and her 1-year-old son Cameron Jimenez get their picture taken in front of Endeavour in Westchester.

    Oct. 12, 2012
    7:00 a.m.

    La Tijera and Sepulveda Blvds.

    Hundreds gather in Westchester to see shuttle
    Endeavour, on its way to the California Science Center, stops at a parking lot in L.A.'s Westchester neighborhood.
    Endeavour, on its way to the California Science Center, stops at a parking lot in L.A.'s Westchester neighborhood. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

    Early morning light bathed Endeavour’s weathered body in a pink glow Friday morning as more than 500 people gathered in a Westchester parking lot to catch a glimpse of the space shuttle on the first leg of its final journey.

    “When else do you get to see something like this in your own backyard?” said Jennie DiPaolo, 49, whose two sons, Luke and Matthew, were wearing red St. Anastasia Catholic School sweat shirts. “We can go see it in the museum, but this is our neighborhood. We drive by here every day.”

    Oct. 12, 2012
    5:45 a.m.

    La Tijera and Sepulveda Blvds.

    Endeavour leaves LAX property for Westchester
    (KTLA-TV, Channel 5)

    Tree branches and other obstacles caused small delays in the space shuttle Endeavour’s move from LAX to a Westchester shopping center parking lot, where it is being parked for nine hours.

    More: Endeavour takes a break at Westchester shopping center

    Oct. 11, 2012
    11:30 p.m.

    Los Angeles International Airport

    Shuttle leaves United hangar at LAX
    Endeavour begins its departure from LAX late Thursday.
    Endeavour begins its departure from LAX late Thursday. (Bryan Chan / Los Angeles Times)

    The space shuttle Endeavour has begun its final journey, leaving a Los Angeles International Airport hangar just before midnight Thursday.

    Oct. 11, 2012
    8:00 a.m.

    Randy's Donuts

    City Beat: Randy’s celebrates with shuttle doughnuts
    As the space shuttle Endeavour is moved from LAX to the Science Center it will pass Randy's Donuts at the corner of Manchester and La Cienega. The shop sold shuttle shaped doughnuts on Thursday, but will be closed during the event.
    As the space shuttle Endeavour is moved from LAX to the Science Center it will pass Randy's Donuts at the corner of Manchester and La Cienega. The shop sold shuttle shaped doughnuts on Thursday, but will be closed during the event. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)

    Randy’s Donuts, at Manchester and La Cienega boulevards, was all set to be shuttle viewing central. The brothers put a miniature shuttle in the giant doughnut hole. They put a yellow sign in the window: “SPACE SHUTTLE XING.” They started punching out shuttle doughnuts with a special cookie cutter they got from a place called the Space Store, Ron Weintraub said. They iced them white with brown letters, USA and NASA.

    But that stretch of Manchester will be closed from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m., crowds discouraged. So Randy’s, which is usually 24-7, planned to shut at 8 p.m. Thursday.

    I’ve seen all the other capsules go up, I’ve seen them go in the water. And they’re not going to let me see this any other way?” Ora Alcox asked Larry Weintraub, who owns Randy’s with his brother Ron.

    Oct. 10, 2012

    California Science Center at Exposition Park

    Endeavour’s route from LAX to the California Science Center
    (Raoul Rañoa)

    Here is the route Endeavour is expected to follow Friday and Saturday from LAX to its new home at the California Science Center.

    Published: Oct. 12, 2012
    Sources: Times staff reports
    Credits: Samantha Schaefer, TimelineSetter
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